List of the most worst and common passwords of 2019

1
 Keeper Security and SplashData, the developer of the popular Password Managers Keeper software, made a list and rating of the most frequently crack/hack passwords for the year 2019. As determined by SplashData on its annual report. Use of any of the passwords on this list would put users at grave risk for identity theft.

    In its  annual Worst Passwords report, compiled from more than five million passwords leaked during the year, “starwars” joins the list at #16.  “Hackers are using common terms from pop culture and sports to break into accounts online because they know many people are using those easy-to-remember words.”  These past four years have been particularly devastating for data security, with a number of well publicized hacks, attacks, ransoms, and even extortion attempts. Millions of records have been stolen.    Even with the risks well known, many millions of people continue to use weak, easily-guessable passwords to protect their online information. For the fourth consecutive year, “123456” and “password” retain their top two spots on the list. Variations of each, either with extra digits on the numerical string or replacing the “o” with a “0” in “password,” comprise six of the remaining passwords on the list.

“Hackers know your tricks, and merely tweaking an easily guessable password does not make it secure,” says Slain. “Our hope is that our Worst Passwords of the Year list will cause people to take steps to protect themselves online.” While some say baseball is America’s pastime, it is football that continues to dominate on the list of dangerous passwords. For the third year in a row, football is the only sport to crack the Top 25 — though it dropped four spots on this year’s list to the #9 spot.

Protection of personal data on the Internet in recent years has become a hotly debated topic. Everyone wants his correspondence chats, photos, documents and other data securely protected. But sometimes users do not care enough about the safety of their personal information. For example, people use simple and common passwords that can easily be guessed, even without being a hacker. It will be a good idea to get a family lawyer okc, just for additional protection.

For the romantics out there, the self-focused “loveme” has been replaced on this year’s list with “iloveyou.” Other new appearances on the list include “letmein”, “monkey“, “hello”, “freedom”, “whatever” and “trustno1.” One other new entry is “qazwsx” from the two left columns on standard keyboards – demonstrating the importance of avoiding simple patterns.

Over five million leaked passwords evaluated for the 2017 list were mostly held by users in North America and Western Europe.  Passwords leaked from hacks of adult websites and from the Yahoo email breach were not included in this report.

    Presenting SplashData’s “Worst Passwords of 2017”:

Rank
Password
Change from 2015
1
123456
Unchanged
2
Password
Unchanged
3
Up 1
4
qwerty
Up 2
5
12345
Down 2
6
New
7
letmein
New
8
Unchanged
9
football
Down 4
10
iloveyou
New
11
admin
Up 4
12
welcome
Unchanged
13
monkey
New
14
login
Down 3
15
abc123
Down 1
16
starwars
New
17
123123
New
18
dragon
Up 1
19
passw0rd
Down 1
20
master
Up 1
21
hello
New
22
freedom
New
23
whatever
New
24
qazwsx
New
25
trustno1
New

 

An estimates almost 10% of people have used at least one of the 25 worst
passwords on this year’s list, and nearly 3% of people have used the
worst password, 123456.
    Keeper Security offers three simple tips to be safer from hackers online:
    1. Use passphrases of twelve characters or more with mixed types of characters including upper and lower cases.   

 

    1. Use a different password for each of your website logins.  If a hacker gets your
      password they will try it to access other sites.   

 

  1. Protect
    your assets and personal identity by using a password manager to
    organize passwords, generate secure random passwords, and automatically
    log into websites.  

To help protect computer users from hackers and to do its part in
preventing 2019 from becoming another “Year of the Hack,” SplashData is
offering the full list of Top 100 Worst Passwords, a free one-year
subscription for individuals to its Gpass password manager, and a
TeamsID (password manager for enterprise workgroups) demo for
businesses.

Thus, the 25 commonly used worst passwords of the year 2019 are as follows:

123456
123456789
Qwerty
12345678
111111
1234567890
1234567
password
123123
987654321
Qwertyuiop
Mynoob
123321
666666
18atckd2w
7777777
1q2w3e4r
654321
555555
3rjs1la7qe
google
1q2w3e4r5t
123qwe
zxcvbnm
1q2w3e

Other common password combination list are as follows:

Boyfriends/Girlfriend names
Date of birth
Phone Number
ATM PIN/Passwords
Spouse names
User first name
Surnames
Nicknames 

1 Comment
  1. Pablo Escober says

    Wow so many people still have weak password why not try bonjourjesus0012 cool right

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